With motorcycle season in full swing in Texas, it is important for you to remember that as much enjoyment as you receive from riding down the open road on your bike, you nevertheless risk receiving significant injuries in the event of a crash.

OurEverydayLife.com reports that since your bike offers you little protection as compared to a car or truck, you likely will suffer one of the following three types of injuries should you become involved in a crash:

  1. Head injury
  2. Broken bones
  3. Road rash
  4. Head injuries

It goes without saying that you should always wear a helmet when you ride. Even so, a crash could result in your receiving a serious head injury such as a traumatic brain injury. In this type of injury, your head strikes the ground or another hard object with sufficient force to cause your brain to violently swing back and forth inside your skull. This motion, in turn, results in your brain’s cells and tissues becoming injured to the extent that your brain itself begins malfunctioning in one or several ways. A TBI can cause you a lifetime of physical, emotional and mental issues.

  1. Broken bones

Since your body has virtually no protection during a motorcycle crash, you face a high risk of suffering broken bones, particularly in your legs and arms, when your bike turns over. In addition, your body, legs and/or arms can become caught underneath it, which in a worst case scenario could result not only in broken bones, but also a spinal cord injury or an amputation of one of your limbs.

  1. Road rash

Even if you wear protective clothing every time you ride, this may not be sufficient to prevent your receiving a serious road rash when your body slides along the surface of the road during a crash. The severity of your road rash injuries likely will depend on the road surface itself, plus the speed at which you were traveling at the time of your accident and the length of time your body was subjected to the sliding. Road rash injuries can result in your need for multiple surgeries and skin grafts to minimize the scarring they usually produce.

This is general educational information and not intended to provide legal advice.